Luca Ferrero

Title

Professor of Philosophy

Contact Information

luca.ferrero@ucr.edu

Areas of Interest

 Agency Theory, including Intentionality and Personal identity; Practical Reasoning; Meta-Ethics

PhilPapers Profile
Academia Profile

Jozef Müller

mullerTitle

Assistant Professor

Contact Information

(951)827-1515
jozef.muller@ucr.edu

Education

Ph.D. Princeton University

Areas of Interest

Ancient Philosophy, especially Aristotle, Plato, and the Stoics

Profile

Jozef Müller’s current research focuses on Aristotle’s ethics and moral psychology, but he is interested in all aspects and areas of ancient philosophy. Among his other teaching and research interests are history of ethics, aesthetics, and philosophy of action.

For more information, visit his website www.jozefmuller.org

Mark Wrathall

WrathallTitle

Professor of Philosophy

Contact Information

mark [dot] wrathall [at] ucr [dot] edu

Education

Ph.D., UC Berkeley; J.D., Harvard University

Areas of Interest

Existential and phenomenological traditions in philosophy, particularly phenomenological accounts of perception, language, art, religion, and law.

Profile

Mark Wrathall is the Graduate Advisor for the department. His research focuses on the existential and phenomenological traditions in philosophy. He is particularly interested in phenomenological accounts of perception, language, art, religion, and law. Wrathall is the author of How to Read Heidegger, and has edited several collections of essays, including A Companion to Phenomenology and Existentialism and Religion after Metaphysics. Recent articles draw on the work of Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, Sartre, Nietzsche, and Pascal. He has taught courses over the past few years on phenomenology, existentialism, perception, art, and the philosophy of law. Wrathall is currently working on a book-length manuscript on Heidegger’s later work, and editing The Cambridge Companion to Heidegger’s Being and Time.

For more information, visit his website.

Howard Wettstein

Wettstein

Title

Professor of Philosophy

Contact Information

HMNSS 3212
951-827-1520
howard[dot]wettstein[at]ucr[dot]edu

Education

Ph.D., City University of New York, 1976
B.A., Yeshiva College, 1965

Areas of Interest

Philosophy of Language, Philosophy of Mind, philosophy of religion.

Profile

Professor Wettstein has written three books—The Significance of Religious Experience (Oxford University Press, 2012), The Magic Prism: An Essay in the Philosophy of Language (Oxford University Press, 2004) and Has Semantics Rested On a Mistake?, and Other Essays (Stanford University Press, 1991)—and a number of papers in the philosophy of language, for many years the focus of his research. During the last decade an additional focus has been the philosophy of religion; he has published on topics like religious experience, awe, the problem of evil, and the viability of philosophical theology.  He is an Editor of Midwest Studies in Philosophy, and has edited a number of other volumes including Themes From Kaplan (Oxford University Press, 1989, co-edited) and Diasporas and Exiles (University of California Press, 2002).

Selected Publications

     Books and Collections

  • The Significance of Religious Experience, Oxford University Press, 2012.
  • The Magic Prism: An Essay in the Philosophy of Language, Oxford University Press, 2004.
  • Diasporas and Exiles: Varieties of Jewish Identity (editor), University of California Press, 2002.
  • Has Semantics Rested on a Mistake?, And Other Essays, Stanford University Press, 1990
  • Themes from Kaplan, (co-editor) Oxford, 1989
  • Midwest Studies in Philosophy (co-editor), 1977–present

     Selected Articles

Eric Schwitzgebel

EricSchwitzgebel

Title

Professor of Philosophy

Contact Information

HMNSS 3208
951-827-4288
eric.schwitzgebel@ucr.edu

Education

Ph.D., UC Berkeley, 1997

Areas of Interest

Connections between empirical psychology and philosophy of mind, especially the nature of belief, the inaccuracy of our judgments about our stream of conscious experience, and the tenuous relationship between philosophical ethics and actual moral behavior.

Profile

Most of Professor Schwitzgebel’s research explores connections between empirical psychology and philosophy of mind, especially the nature of belief, the inaccuracy of our judgments about our stream of conscious experience, and the tenuous relationship between philosophical ethics and actual moral behavior. He is co-author, with psychologist Russell T. Hurlburt, of Describing Inner Experience? Proponent Meets Skeptic (2007). He maintains a secondary interest in classical Chinese philosophy.

Visit his web site for more.

Erich Reck

ErichReck(new)

Title

Professor Philosophy

Contact Information

HMNSS 3206
951-827-3760 (message phone)
erich.reck@ucr.edu

Education

Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1992

Areas of Interest

History of analytic philosophy and the philosophy of logic, mathematics, and science.

Profile

Professor Reck’s main research interests lie in the history of analytic philosophy and the philosophy of logic, mathematics, and science. Other interests include twentieth-century philosophy more generally, the philosophy of language, and aesthetics. He is the editor, or co-editor, of From Frege to Wittgenstein: Perspectives on Early Analytic Philosophy, Gottlob Frege: Critical Assessments of Leading Philosophers, Vols. I–IV (with M. Beaney), and The Historical Turn in Analytical Philosophy, as well as the co-translator of Frege’s Lectures on Logic: Carnap’s Student Notes, 1910–1914 (with S. Awodey). In addition, he has published a number of articles on Frege, Wittgenstein, Carnap, the history and philosophy of logic, and the history and philosophy of mathematics. During recent years he has taught undergraduate classes in logic, the philosophy of mathematics, twentieth-century analytic philosophy, and on the infinite, and graduate seminars on Frege, early and later Wittgenstein, rule following, the notion of sense, and scientific explanation.

Visit his web site for more.

Andrews Reath

Andrews Reath

Title

Professor of Philosophy

Contact Information

HMNSS 3218
951-827-1518 (message phone)
andrews.reath@ucr.edu

Education

Ph.D., Harvard University, 1984

Areas of Interest

Moral philosophy, in particular Kant’s practical philosophy, with additional interests in the history of moral philosophy.

Profile

Professor Reath works in the area of moral philosophy, in particular Kant’s practical philosophy, with additional interests in the history of moral philosophy. His work on Kant has focused on his moral psychology, his conception of autonomy, and the foundational arguments in the Groundwork and the Critique of Practical Reason. In 2006 he published a collection of essays on these topics, Agency and Autonomy in Kant’s Moral Theory (Oxford). He has also co-edited (with Jens Timmermann) a collection of new essays on the Critique of Practical ReasonKant’s Critique of Practical Reason: A Critical Guide (Cambridge 2010). Current projects include attempts to understand the sense in which Kant’s Categorical Imperative is a formal principle, Kant’s account of free agency, his general conception of rational agency, and a short book on the argument of the Groundwork.

ReathBookCover-mini

Selected Publications

Books:

  • Agency and Autonomy in Kant’s Moral Theory (Oxford university Press, 2006)—a collection of 7 previously published essays and 2 previously unpublished essays, “Autonomy of the Will as the Foundation of Morality” and “Agency and Universal Law.”

Edited Books:

 Articles (some of which are linked as a pdf):

 

John Perry

Perry

Title

Distinguished Professor of Philosophy

Contact Information

HMNSS 3306
951-827-5231 (message phone)
john.perry@ucr.edu

Education

Ph.D., Cornell University, 1968

Areas of Interest

Philosophy of Language and Mind

Profile

Professor Perry received his B.A. in Philosophy from Doane College and his Ph.D. from Cornell in 1968. He was a member of the Philosophy Department at UCLA from 1968 to 1974, and since 1974 has been at Stanford University, where he is the Henry Walgrave Stuart Professor of Philosophy. Professor Perry comes to Riverside half time, in conjunction with his phased retirement from Stanford. Professor Perry has published several books and many articles on the philosophy of language and the philosophy of mind. He received a Jean Nicod Prize (France), a Humboldt Prize (Germany), and a Guggenheim Fellowship. At Stanford he served as the Chair of the Philosophy Department for many years, and also as Director of the Center for the Study of Language and Information, which he helped to found in 1983. He is co-host of the radio program “Philosophy Talk.”

Michael Nelson

Nelson

Title

Associate Professor of Philosophy

Contact Information

HMNSS 3305
951-827-1510 (message phone)
michael.nelson@ucr.edu

Education

Ph.D., Princeton University, 2002

Areas of Interest

Philosophy of Language, focusing on propositional attitude reports, pragmatics, and indexicality; Metaphysics, focusing on the metaphysics of time and modality and the nature of particularity; Agency theory.

Profile

Professor Nelson taught as a visiting assistant professor at the University of Arizona and as an assistant professor at Yale University before coming to UCR. His research has focused on issues in philosophy of language and philosophy of mind. He is interested in theories of communication and how, by uttering sentences, there is, in cases of success, a meeting of minds in which the audience comes to think the thought the speaker intended.

Selected Publications

“Time in Person and Thought,” in A. Capone and N. Feit, eds., Attitudes De Se: Linguistics, Epistemology, Metaphysics (Center for the Study of Language and Information, 2013).

“Existence”, The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Winter 2012 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.), URL = http://plato.stanford.edu/archives/win2012/entries/existence/

“Singular Propositions”, Fitch, Greg and Nelson, Michael, The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Winter 2012 Edition, updating Winter 2007 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.), URL = http://plato.stanford.edu/archives/win2012/entries/propositions-singular/

“A Defense of Contingent Logical Truths,” with Edward Zalta, Philosophical Studies 157: 1 (2012): 153-162.

“Default Compatibilism and Narrativity: Comments on John Martin Fischer’s Ways and Stories,” Social Theory and Practice 31: 1 (2011): 35-45.

“Intentional Contexts,” in Max Kolbel and Manuel Garcia-Carpintero, eds., Continuum Companion to the Philosophy of Language (Continuum, 2011): 126-153.

“Propositional Attitude Reports,” McKay, Thomas and Nelson, Michael, The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Winter 2010 Edition, updating Winter 2005 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.), URL = http://plato.stanford.edu/archives/win2010/entries/prop-attitude-reports/

“Quantifying In and Anti-Essentialism,” in N. Griffin and D. Jacquette, eds., Russell vs. Meinong: The Legacy of ‘On Denoting’ (Routledge, 2009): 297-342.

“The Contingency of Existence,” in L.M. Jorgensen and S. Newlands, eds., Metaphysics and the Good: Themes from the Philosophy of Robert Merrihew Adams (Oxford University Press, 2009): 95-155.

“Bennett and Proxy Actualism,” with Edward Zalta, Philosophical Studies 142: 2 (2009): 277-292.

“Frege and the Paradox of Analysis,” Philosophical Studies 137: 2 (2008)” 159-181.

“Ways an Actualist Might Be,” Philosophical Studies 133:3 (2007): 455-471.

“The Problem of Puzzling Pairs,” Linguistics and Philosophy 28:3 (2005): 319-350.

“Puzzling Pairs,” Philosophical Studies 108:1-2 (2002): 109-119.

“Descriptivism Defended,” Nous 36:3 (2002): 408-436.

“Presentists Should Believe in Time-Travel,” Australasian Journal of Philosophy 79:3 (2001): 333-345.

“Wittgenstein’s Incompleteness, Salmon’s Intuitions,” Nous 33:4 (1999): 573-589.

Coleen Macnamara

MacNamara

Title

Associate Professor of Philosophy

Contact Information

HMNSS 3201
951-827-1511 (message phone)
coleen.macnamara@ucr.edu

Education

Ph.D., Georgetown University, 2006

Areas of Interest

Ethics and Moral Psychology

Profile

Professor Macnamara’s research interests lie at the intersection of ethics and moral psychology. She is currently working on developing a theory of holding others responsible, explicating this activity’s conceptual core, typology, and ethics. In the recent past she taught a graduate course on deontic pluralism and is currently teaching undergraduate courses in bioethics and feminist bioethics.

Selected Publications

“Beyond Belief: Toward a Theory of the Reactive Attitudes,” co-authored with Elisa
Hurley. Philosophical Papers 39 (3) (2010): 373-99.

“Holding Others Responsible,” Philosophical Studies 152 (2011): 81-102.

“‘Screw You!’ & ‘Thank You,’” Philosophical Studies 165(3) (2013): 893-914.

“Taking Demands Out of Blame,” in D. J. Coates & N. Tognazzini (eds.), Blame: Its nature and
norms. New York: Oxford University Press (2013).

“Reactive Attitudes as Communicative Entities.” Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 88 (2) 2013).

“Blame, Communication and Morally Responsible Agency,” forthcoming in R. Clarke, M.McKenna & A. Smith (eds.), The Nature of Moral Responsibility. New York: Oxford University Press.