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February 2019

3rd Annual Graduate Program Conference on Agency

February 15 @ 3:00 pm - February 16 @ 5:30 pm

Keynote Speakers: Myisha Cherry UC Riverside, "Breaking the Rules Through Rage" Friday (2/15), INTS, 3 - 5 pm Manual Vargas UC San Diego, "The Social Infrastructure of Responsible Agency" Saturday (2/16), INTS 3:30-5:30 pm Presentations by: Sam Ridge (University of Houston) Shawn Wang (UC San Diego) Jeffrey Pannekoek (University of Tennesse, Knoxville) David Storrs-Fox (New York University) Mitchell Wingett (Western Michigan) To view the thorough schedule, please click here.

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March 2019

Thomas Singh Khurana (Yale University and University of Essex)

March 8 @ 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
HMNSS 1500

The Art of Second Nature by Thomas Singh Khurana of Yale University and University of Essex While the concept of “second nature” has received remarkable attention in recent years, the discussion has mainly focused on neo-Aristotelian accounts. In developing the idea that reason can become second nature to us through habituation into the right kinds of practices, the contemporary discussion has given the notion both a therapeutic and a normative significance. Therapeutically, the reminder that our rational second nature is…

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Ernest Sosa (Rutgers University)

March 13 @ 4:10 pm - 6:00 pm
HMNSS 1500

Insight and Understanding Synopsis: I propose to explore a particular sort of understanding, understanding why, and a related sort of knowledge why—firsthand knowledge why—and the place of this in the humanities, including philosophy. We shall focus on one dimension of the humanities, not the whole, and on the humanistic side of philosophy, though there’s a lot more to philosophy than that. I’ll be arguing for the importance of firsthand intuitive insight. And that in turn will bear interestingly on two questions in the epistemology of the humanities,…

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April 2019

Colloquia: Elizabeth Schechter (Washington University)

April 1 @ 3:10 pm - 5:00 pm
HMNSS 1500

Title: “Self-consciousness in split-brain subjects” Abstract: Consciousness has sometimes been said to be dual, or divided, after split-brain surgery. But what about self-consciousness? In this paper, I argue that after split-brain surgery the two hemispheres are associated with distinct self-conscious thinkers. On the other hand, because they are so substantially co-embodied, these thinkers cannot distinguish themselves from each other. Self-consciousness in a split-brain subject is in this respect unlike self-consciousness in any pair of human beings.  

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Colloquia: Kim Frost (Syracuse University)

April 3 @ 3:10 pm - 5:00 pm

Title: "Mistakes and Malfunctions" Abstract: Humans make mistakes. We paint ourselves into corners, jump to conclusions, stumble, fumble and generally bumble. For the philosopher of mind it’s natural to think that such mistakes must be malfunctions of some kind. I will argue that on the most interesting senses of “malfunction” that’s false. I will also argue that if we want to explain what mistakes are, metaphysically speaking, then we should employ a metaphysics of mind that admits powers as basic…

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Colloquium – Tamar Schapiro (MIT)

April 4 @ 3:10 pm - 5:00 pm
HMNSS 1500

For more information on Tamar Schapiro, please click here. 

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Colloquium – Adam Harmer (UCR)

April 10 @ 3:10 pm - 5:00 pm

Date and Time are still TBD.   For more information on Adam Harmer, please click here. 

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May 2019

Colloquium – Annalisa Coliva (UC Irvine)

May 8 @ 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
HMNSS 1500

For more information on Annalisa Coliva, please click here. 

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“Hinge Disagreement”

May 8 @ 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
HMNSS 1500

"Hinge Disagreement" By: Annalisa Coliva (UC Irvine) Abstract: How is it possible to make sense of disagreement between people holding different and incompatible "hinges" - that is, basic propositions that make the acquisition of evidence possible in the first place? On certain versions of hinge epistemology, it is not possible at all (call this "the lost disagreement problem"). Moreover, should people endorse different hinges, it would not be possible rationally to resolve the situation in favor of one or the other party (call…

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Colloquium – Monique Wonderly (UCSD) “On Un-Forgiving”

May 29 @ 3:10 pm - 5:00 pm
HMNSS 1500

On Un-Forgiving Theorists tend to conceive of forgiveness as “wiping the slate clean,” or something of the sort with respect to the wrongdoer’s moral infraction. This raises a puzzle concerning how (or whether) the relevant wrong can continue to play a role in the forgiver’s deliberations, attitudes, and practical orientation toward the wrongdoer once forgiveness has taken place. For example, consider an individual who forgives an agent for an act of wrongdoing only to later blame her again for that very…

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